Tree Fruit Cherry articles

Benefits of container-grown trees: Many transplant problems can be prevented and early growth of roots and tops can be markedly improved, when container-grown or potted trees are used instead of bare-rooted dormant trees.

Published in Trees/nurseries

As the cherry season enters the last few weeks of harvest in Australia, growers may soon have a little free time to do some valuable reading about cherries. Although the recently released book, Sweet Cherries is based on cherry growing in the USA, two of the authors, Lynn Long and Greg Lang are well known in Australia.

Published in Crop/Growth management

Adult cherry aphids are dark coloured and approximately 2 mm in size. The adult population consists of winged and wingless individuals.

Published in Pests

The Voen self-ventilating covering system was invented more than 15 years ago by German cherry grower, Reinhard Vöhringer.

Published in Permanent Structures

Deciduous fruit trees, such as apple, pear, cherry, plum, peach or apricot are purchased and planted in commercial orchards in Australia only as bare-rooted dormant trees.
However, there is no rational explanation why they cannot also be grown and sold as container-grown trees, like citrus.

Published in Trees/nurseries

Helicoverpa species (commonly known as budworms) can cause substantial crop damage and are becoming more common across all Australian growing regions.
The moth larvae can cause extensive feeding damage and also create entry points for secondary pests and diseases.

Published in Pests

John Baker of Produce Marketing has kindly made available the 2020 season review by NorthWest Cherries.
Much information about season timing, production volumes (including data from California) and consumer preferences are shown.
Timing of the pandemic in relation to the cherry season in our two countries is different because the northern hemisphere season in the USA is May to August. In Australia the season across the regions is normally October to February.

Published in Crop/Growth management

Netting is a long term investment, and that investment quickly pays for itself in financial returns—as A1 packouts every season because there is:
no hail damaged fruit
reduced wind rub and sunburn
water savings.

Published in Permanent Structures

Temperature is a key driver of insect development. Degree days (DD) is a measure of temperature over time and it is used to predict the timing of life stages of certain insect pests.
A degree day model counts the total time that temperature is above the minimum required for the pest to develop (lower developmental threshold).

Published in Pests

Australian cherry growers remain concerned about the availability and willingness of harvest labour—not just for their crop, but for all crops that need fruit pickers.
Cherries in particular have a short shelf life and harvesting cannot be delayed more than a day at the most during the warm to hot months.

Published in Crop/Growth management