Tree Fruit - Apple articles

The codling moth is favoured by warm, dry growing conditions between spring and autumn.
Eggs are laid around dusk when the temperature is 16C or higher and the air is calm.

Published in Pests

Summer trunk canker is more common during prolonged wet, windy spring and summer seasons on soils that are poorly drained.

Published in Disease

Extreme temperatures affect fruit trees and lately, the weather has been all over the place.
It can be difficult for plants to recover after damaging weather conditions such as excessive heat, hail, frost and flood.

Published in Nutrition

With the cool start to the season, we are seeing several fruit tree crops slow in moving through their phenological stages.

Published in Nutrition

Losses in fruit production can be due to inadequate plant nutrition.
Diseases such as tip burn, blossom end rot and bitter pit are all caused by calcium deficiency.

Published in Nutrition

“The establishment of Screen Duo and Photon 500SG as frontline management tools has been a game changer for tree fruit growers in recent years,” said Jim Lyons of Sipcam.

Published in Sunburn

Unfortunately the answers to many questions about why and how fruit trees grow and produce fruit are found in scientific journals. These are not written for orchardists.

Published in Crop/Growth management

Apply research findings to commercial orchard conditions: To encourage commercial adoption of the Tatura Trellis as a fully integrated system of orchard management, we did the following:
Scientific papers published in international horticulture and soil science journals, and conference presentations, were re-written for grower magazines, chapters in books, Technotes, DAV Research Reports and newspaper articles.

Published in Crop/Growth management

Irrigation water supply can often be less than crop water requirement during a drought—this leads to tree water stress and subsequent loss in fruit size and yield in apple orchards.

Published in Crop/Growth management

Warm, moist conditions that favour tree growth and brown rot also favour the oriental fruit moth (OFM).

Published in Pests